I have a discharge - do I have an STI?

Most girls and women have vaginal discharge during their reproductive years. Discharge is normal if a clear or white liquid comes out of your vagina from time-to-time during your monthly cycle. It may feel a bit wet and sticky, but shouldn’t smell bad. If you have a discharge that has changed recently, smells bad, is brown or creamy in colour, or you have itching or sores around your vagina, you may have an infection and need to seek medical attention.

Different types of vaginal discharges that need medical attention:

• Thrush (Candida)
Thrush is an infection of the vagina that causes itching, as well as a creamy discharge. It is very common. It is not a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) but can be sexually transmitted.

• Bacterial Vaginosis
Bacterial vaginosis is an infection of the vagina that causes a watery, bad smelling discharge. Although bacterial vaginosis is not an STI, having many sexual partners as well as cleaning your vagina with strong soaps can put you at risk for this infection.

• Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea
Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea are STIs that can cause an unusual discharge, or pain when you pee. Sometimes people don't have any symptoms of these STIs. If these infections are not treated they can cause damage to your womb, tubes and ovaries and if untreated may result in infertility.

Seek care as soon as possible if you have any symptoms or if you are concerned!

Not all infections are sexually transmitted, but it is not always easy to tell the difference. It is important that you and your partner see a nurse or a doctor to get tested and treated for all infections. Remember to avoid having unprotected sex until your doctor or nurse has advised you that it is safe to do so!

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Anonymous 4 September 2018 19:27

When does one ovulate n how do I know that I am ovulating

B-Wise Expert Expert 7 September 2018 18:30

Hi there anonymous, thank you for your question. Ovulation in most times takes place in the middle of your menstrual cycle. So if you count from the first day of your period to the first day of your next period, ovulation should take place in the middle of that. For example, if your period takes place between 28 days, then your ovulation should take place on day 14.

The only way in which you can be able to know when exactly are you ovulating is to track your period start dates on a calendar for 3 months and then look at the average length of your cycle. Then find a day in the middle of your cycle. This is where you are most likely to fall pregnant.

Here are other ways you can tell if you are ovulating:

•             During your ovulation period, your body  temperature is more likely to                increase (about 0.5 degrees Celsius)

•             When your cervical mucus becomes thicker and more sticky

•             You can also buy an ovulation test kit from a pharmacy to check if you                are ovulating.

If maybe you are trying to get pregnant, we would advise you to first get health screening. This includes HIV testing, STI screening, and Pap smear. You can also read more about menstruation facts in our short article here: https://bwisehealth.com/article/menstruation-facts-what-is-your-period

 You can visit your nearest clinic for these tests. Click on the link and find a clinic close to you https://bwisehealth.com/clinic/search/



Anonymous 10 March 2018 10:16

Wat does a normal healthy discharge smell and look like

B-Wise Expert Expert 9 April 2018 13:55

Hi, thank you for your question. You can read our article on I have a discharge - do I have an STI?  for more information 



Ano 10 March 2018 10:15

What if you just have a yellowish snot- like discharge without the other symptoms and during ovulution it looks like water and have white spots at the same time.

B-Wise Expert Expert 5 April 2018 17:17

Hi Ano, thank you for your question. This sounds like an infection in the genital area, you can get this infection by having sex. It is very important that you visit a doctor or a clinic to get treated so that the infection can go away. Your sex partner(s), also need to go to the clinic to get treated as well. It is also important to use a condom when you have sex so that you prevent getting the infection again.  It is possible to get the infection without having sex, but you need to visit a clinic or a doctor to know how you got the infection. You can use the Clinic Finder on B-wise health to help you find a local clinic. 



vivian 25 April 2016 22:01

Is it true that women take time in detecting an STI than man?and if so,why?

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 April 2018 14:42

HI viv

Thank you for your question. You can read our section on STIs for more information 



Anonymous 7 April 2016 14:57

I once read on an internet about digestion, is it possible that a human being can live without stomach? And if so, is there anyone in the world who currently live under this situation?

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 April 2018 14:52

What an interesting question. Yes you can live withouth a stomach, although this is not common. The whole stomach is sometimes removed as a treatment for stomach cancer this is called a gastrectomy. After a few weeks of recovery, you are able to eat most foods, but may need to eat smaller meals and take dietary supplements.



B-Wise Expert Expert 11 April 2016 14:24

What an interesting question. Yes you can live withouth a stomach, although this is not common. The whole stomach is sometimes removed as a treatment for stomach cancer this is called a gastrectomy. After a few weeks of recovery, you are able to eat most foods, but may need to eat smaller meals and take dietary supplements.


Maneliza 1 March 2016 10:59

If I treat it and it doesn't go away what must I do then

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 April 2018 15:49

Hi Maneliza Well done for getting treated, sorry that it's not clear yet. Go back to the clinic and tell the nurse or doctor about your symptoms as you may need extra treatment. STIs are spread by having unprotected sex. It is important that your partner is also treated to prevent repeat infection. Using condoms lowers your risk of STIs.



B-Wise Expert Expert 21 March 2016 00:54

Hi Maneliza Well done for getting treated, sorry that it's not clear yet. Go back to the clinic and tell the nurse or doctor about your symptoms as you may need extra treatment. STIs are spread by having unprotected sex. It is important that your partner is also treated to prevent repeat infection. Using condoms lowers your risk of STIs.