Different kinds of contraceptives and family planning: options to prevent pregnancy

It is important to learn about the different kinds of contraception before you choose the best one for you! Here is some information but it is best to talk to your doctor or nurse to get more information.


Condoms:

  • The male condom is worn by a man and keeps sperm from getting into a woman's body.
  • The female condom is worn by a woman and helps keeps sperm from getting into her body.
  • This is the only contraception that prevents HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as herpes.
  • They are free at your local clinic and can be cheap at some pharmacies and shops

Contraceptive Pill:

  • These pills come in a packet of 28 and you should take them once daily at the same time.
  • It prevents your body from being able to fall pregnant by stopping the egg each month.
  • It does not prevent STIs and HIV.
  • It is free at your local clinic.

Injection:

  • You will get an injection from a doctor or nurse every 2 months (alternative injections are every 3 months).
  • It prevents your body from being able to fall pregnant by stopping the egg each month.
  • It is very convenient and you don't have to take pills every day
  • It does not prevent STIs and HIV.
  • It is free at your local clinic.

Sub-dermal Contraceptive Implant:

  • A thin stick (the size of a match stick) that is put under the skin of a women's upper arm.
  • It prevents pregnancy for 3 years by stopping your body from releasing the egg every month. The pill, injection and implant all work in the same way.
  • It is the most effective form of contraception
  • It does not prevent STIs and HIV.
  • It is free at your local clinic.

IUD (Intrauterine contraceptive device)

  • A device is put inside your vagina (in the womb) by a doctor or nurse
  • It stops the sperm and egg from meeting and making a baby.
  • It can last for at between 5-10 years.
  • It does not prevent STIs and HIV.

Emergency Contraception**

Morning After Pill

  • Should only be used as emergency pill. It is not healthy to use it again and again.
  • It must be taken between 72-120 hours (3-5 days) after you had unprotected sex (sex without a condom).
  • It is free at your local clinic and can be cheap at some pharmacies.
** The IUD (see above) can also be used as an emergency contraceptive method.

Permanent contraception

Voluntary Sterilisation:

  • A doctor performs an operation where the pathway for sperm (in men) or an egg (in women) is tied or cut.
  • It can be undone but doesn't mean that you'll be able to fall pregnant again.
  • It does not prevent STIs including HIV.
  • It's free at some health care facilities.

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B-Wise User Anonymous 14 November 2018 13:54

Is it safe for me to have sex while im on my periods?

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 November 2018 11:10

Hi there, yes it is, however if you are HIV infected and you are not on antiretrovirals, there is a risk of increased HIV transmission to your partner. You may also still fall pregnant. So please make sure you use dual protection (contraceptive and condoms).



B-Wise User Anonymous 12 November 2018 18:49

Is it safe for me to have sex while im on my periods?

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 November 2018 11:10

Hi there, yes it is, however if you are HIV infected and you are not on antiretrovirals, there is a risk of increased HIV transmission to your partner. You may also still fall pregnant. So please make sure you use dual protection (contraceptive and condoms).



B-Wise User Boits 9 November 2018 21:30

So since I got Depo injection at first should I wait for my periods to come back to being normal again before I can start with an implant?

B-Wise Expert Expert 10 November 2018 15:44

Hi again Boits,  when you go to the clinic, the nurse will advice you on what would be best for you after they have checked you up.



B-Wise User Boits 7 November 2018 13:22

Hey In July I went for my first Depo injection and I've been having longer periods and that made me change my mind about it...I didnt go for my second one last month.I now want to use an Implant,what will be neede at the clinic when I get there? Please help

B-Wise Expert Expert 8 November 2018 12:43

Hi Boits, thank you for your question. Once you go to the clinic and fill out the forms, you will wait to see a nurse or a doctor. They will check you up and tell you when you can come through to get the implant, if you are lucky they will do it the same time for you.



B-Wise User Anonymous 15 November 2017 10:00

Is there a pill I can use only before having sex but not daily?

B-Wise Expert Expert 5 April 2018 16:36

Hi there, that you for your interesting question. There is no pill that you can take before having sex, but don’t worry there are many different contraceptives that you can use. The condom is ALWAYS your best protection, because it can help to prevent pregnancy and HIV infection. If the pill is not working for you. There is a patch that you can get that lasts for seven days, you put it on you every 7 days. Take a look at our article on Different kinds of contraceptives and family planning: options to prevent pregnancy.



B-Wise User Mimi_1 4 January 2017 09:16

Hi I had sex on the 24 November and took the morning after pill in November 25 and i was bleeding for the whole week from the 7 December bt it was light. I haven't had my period since then and im worried. My last normal period ended November 21 Help please.

B-Wise Expert Expert 4 January 2017 13:34

Thanks so much for your question. You did the right thing by taking the morning after pill. This is normal and your cycle should reset itself within the next two weeks. But if not, go to the clinic for a pregnancy test. It is also a good idea to speak to the nurse about contraception, so you don’t have to take the morning after pill. It’s also a good idea to get tested for HIV and other STIs during your clinic visit. 



B-Wise User justina 6 October 2016 17:18

I would like to know more about a patch and where to get it?

B-Wise Expert Expert 11 October 2016 14:00

Hi Justina, what an excellent question! The patch is a method of contraceptive that you stick to the skin and it releases hormones (progesterone and oestrogen) into the body. These hormones are the same hormones that are in injections and pills. This prevents pregnancy from happening, but it will not prevent HIV or STIs. So remember to still use condoms every time you have sex to prevent HIV and STIs. The patch is not available in public clinics and hospitals, but if you get a prescription from a doctor, you can buy it at a pharmacy. If you want more information on contraceptives check out the section KNOW YOUR BODY: The Basics of S-E-X on B-Wise.


B-Wise User Beyonce_1 12 September 2016 12:17

Hi BWise I recently heard that the Depo injection increases a woman's chance of getting HIV by up to 49%, is this true? I am worried about this coz many women I know are using this injection and not by choice but coz nurses force them to and refuse to give them the pill. they cant afford to buy their pills so they rely on public clinics and no one tells them this risk :-(

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 April 2018 13:44

Hi Beyonce, Thanks for your interest in contraceptives methods. There is research on if the Depo injection increases your chances of getting HIV. No matter what the final results, condoms are the only method that can protect you from HIV and unwanted pregnancy. It is a good idea that to use 'dual protection' or a contraceptive with a condom. Nurses are there to help you choose a contraceptive method that is best for you. For more information on contraceptives check out the KNOW YOUR BODY: Girl's Body Guide.



B-Wise Expert Expert 16 September 2016 14:00

Hi Beyonce, Thanks for your interest in contraceptives methods. There is research on if the Depo injection increases your chances of getting HIV. No matter what the final results, condoms are the only method that can protect you from HIV and unwanted pregnancy. It is a good idea that to use 'dual protection' or a contraceptive with a condom. Nurses are there to help you choose a contraceptive method that is best for you. For more information on contraceptives check out the KNOW YOUR BODY: Girl's Body Guide.


B-Wise User Beyonce_1 8 September 2016 12:05

Hi BWise, I want to put the Sub-dermal Contraceptive Implant but i am anemic, is this a good idea? I am worried about bleeding because the injection made me bleed non-stop and I had to stop using it. I am using the patch at the moment but I wanna use something a little more permanent. PLEASE HELP.

B-Wise Expert Expert 20 April 2018 13:44

Hi Beyonce, it's great that you are asking for help. With the Sub-dermal implant, it is also common to have bleeding like the injection. You can try an intrauterine device (IUD, coil or loop) if you want something more long term. But it is best to talk to your nurse or doctor about your questions or concerns about contraceptive methods. For more information on contraceptives read: https://bwisehealth.com/article/117b52fd-4868-11e6-a49b-d0534926c161



B-Wise Expert Expert 9 September 2016 17:00

Hi Beyonce, it's great that you are asking for help. With the Sub-dermal implant, it is also common to have bleeding like the injection. You can try an intrauterine device (IUD, coil or loop) if you want something more long term. But it is best to talk to your nurse or doctor about your questions or concerns about contraceptive methods. For more information on contraceptives read: https://bwisehealth.com/article/117b52fd-4868-11e6-a49b-d0534926c161


B-Wise User Anonymous 6 November 2015 00:06

very gratfull for this enformaton